About Us

The No Kid Hungry Virginia campaign is the product of a public-private partnership that includes the First Lady of Virginia, Dorothy McAuliffe, the Virginia Department of Health, the Virginia Department of Education, and several corporate partners. Together, we work to end childhood hunger in the Commonwealth.

The No Kid Hungry Virginia campaign connects eligible kids to federal nutrition programs. The campaign is increasing awareness and participation in the School Breakfast Program, the Community Eligibility Provision, the Summer Meals Program, and the At-Risk Afterschool Meals Program.

When the No Kid Hungry Virginia campaign launched in 2011, more than 321,000 children in the state were at risk of hunger, or food insecure. Today, nearly 17 percent of children in Virginia face food insecurity. The work of the No Kid Hungry Virginia campaign continues to improve access to nutritious food programs.

No Kid Hungry Virginia, Share Our Strength, and First Lady Dorothy McAuliffe work to support the Virginia 365 Project to End Childhood Hunger.

News & Updates

First Lady of Virginia Dorothy McAuliffe joined Virginia Secretary of Education Dietra Trent, Virginia State Delegate Roslyn Tyler, Virginia State University Head Football Coach and former NFL player Reggie Barlow and other partners, including No Kid Hungry Virginia and the Southeast Dairy Association at Edward W. Wyatt Middle School on Friday, May 19, to recognize the school for its success in connecting students with breakfast. Edward W. Wyatt Middle School was one of 12 school winners in the Virginia Breakfast Challenge, a campaign to increase school breakfast participation across the state.
May 23, 2017
First Lady Dorothy McAuliffe visited a Valley school on Monday, May 22, to celebrate the hard work of employees to ensure no child goes hungry. Riverheads Elementary was among twelve schools recently recognized for winning the Virginia Breakfast Challenge — a competition between more than 1,300 schools to increase the number of students eating the most important meal of the day.
May 23, 2017
One in eight Americans — 42 million people — still struggles to get enough to eat. And while that number has been going down recently, hunger appears to be getting worse in some economically distressed areas, especially in rural communities. Food banks that serve these areas are also feeling the squeeze, as surplus food supplies dwindle but the lines of people seeking help remain long. As a result, food banks such as Feeding America Southwest Virginia are trying to shorten those lines by doing more to address the root causes of hunger, such as poverty, unemployment and bad health.
May 23, 2017